Give us this day our daily bread……

……Just not the [fill in the blank]

I’m from the End Piece naming camp. Mr. EOS calls it the Stump. There must be a technical industry word for the end but if there is one, I don’t know it.

Whatever you call it, I toss them. They aren’t edible in my book. Unless it’s the end piece of a great loaf of crusty bread then I’m the first one at it. Mmmmmm.

Mr. EOS consumes the stumps. Says to me, it’s part of the loaf, isn’t it?

I say the majority of bread end pieces end up in the trash or used to feed pigeons in Central Park.

What say you??? Eat them? Toss them? Make bread crumbs?

Lots on the pre-Thanksgiving chore list still. The dreaded Polish Silver abs Iron Linens has crept to the top of the list.

Cleaning the ovens was on yesterday’s list and anyone who tells you the secret to cleaning the oven glass is making paste out of baking soda and water, spreading it in the glass and waiting twenty minutes, is wrong. It did nothing other than waste a quarter cup of baking soda.

Happy frosty Tuesday.

17 thoughts on “Give us this day our daily bread……

  1. We called them heels. My dad loved them more than the regular slices. In my small michigan hometown, the bottle (wine, liquor, etc) shop made sandwiches on home baked bread. They had a machine right behind the counter constantly roatating loaves. They would sell bags of heels for like 50¢, for the birds, but my dad would make really vile sandwiches with them. Think bachelor(even though Mom cooked all the time), nothing in the house, let’s put all the condiments (ketchup, mayo, peanut butter), a slice of raw onion and some pickled jalapeños between these crusts of bread and call it good! 🤢 as an aside, he also believed in the four food groups: milk (in the form of an egg cream, which he called a soda), chocolate, cookies and sandwiches.

  2. Hey, nice avatar
    ……Created iPad education
    If I add site to home screen, I get butterfly
    If I add site to favorite, I get drummer
    Huh?

    1. I had a heck of a time changing all the avatars. It requires accessing several points within the admin pages of WP. I would get the “okay you changed” notice then see the drummer girl myself too. It’s a task that might have to wait til I have more time to address. But you aren’t the only one to see the discrepancy. Thanks for telling me so I know where I dig further.

  3. Oh, and I have a bag n the freezer, saving them for stuffing.

    We usually love to eat the heels of good, crusty bread.

    1. The answer is: anything you need to know is found on the internet. Thanks Al Gore.

      Shpitzel? Sounds uniquely Pennsylvania Dutch yet it shows up on Long Island? Maybe it’s a Yiddish word?
      Mr. EOS falls into the “other” category calling it the Stump.

  4. It’s the heel. A good thick heel holds a ton of melted butter when toasted. Yum! It’s the last thing in the turkey cavity-holds the stuffing in.. Reverse it, and you can fool the grandkids into thinking it’s a regular slice of bread when you’re making P B and J sandwiches. Great for mopping up the drippings from filet, steak Diane etc. when you’re alone in the kitchen after dinner (the Devil made me do it). Bibi

  5. My dad called them the heels of the loaf. He’s PA German and grew up in Wilmington, DE.

    Here’s the trick to the heels if you need/want to use them. Grab your Microplane fine grater and shave off the brown in the middle. Put this part on the inside of a grilled cheese sandwich and your picky child will gobble the sandwich down, none the wiser that he/she is eating the heel. Heel used up! Microplane is also a great tool for homemade baked goods that are too dark on the bottom. Simply grate the dark bottom off.

  6. Heels or end pieces are the best. Matter of fact, the best brownie or wad of baked ziti comes from the corner of a square or oblong pan.

    lol! Whaddya do with rolls? Dig out the middle and throw the rest away?

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